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Promote Safety

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Annual Fatalities and Fatality Rate

Description: Number and rate of deaths on Texas roadways.

What is the trend?: (CY 2016 to CY 2017 comparison)

  • Fatalities: Performance Improving green arrow going down
  • Fatality rate: Performance Improving green arrow going down

How it is measured: Annual fatalities is the total number of deaths in reportable motor vehicle traffic crashes in a calendar year.

A reportable motor vehicle traffic crash is any crash investigated by a Texas peace officer, received and processed by TxDOT since the report date, which involved a motor vehicle in transport that occurred or originated on a traffic way, resulted in injury to or death of any person, or damage to the property of any one person to the apparent extent of $1,000.

Fatality rate is the ratio of annual fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles traveled in a year.

Annual Serious Injuries and Serious Injury Rate

Description: Number and rate of serious injuries on Texas roadways.

What is the trend?: (CY 2016 to CY 2017 comparison)

  • Serious injuries: Performance Declining red arrow going up
  • Serious injury rate: Performance Declining red arrow going up

How it is measured: Annual serious injuries is the total number of serious injuries in reportable motor vehicle traffic crashes in a calendar year.

A reportable motor vehicle traffic crash is defined under the Annual Fatalities and Fatality Rate measures.

A serious injury is an incapacitating injury that prevents continuation of normal activities and includes broken or distorted limbs, internal injuries, crushed chest, etc.

Serious injury rate is the ratio of serious injuries per 100 million vehicle miles traveled in a year.

Fatality Emphasis Areas

Description: Number of deaths by specific areas on Texas roadways.

How it is measured: Fatality emphasis areas comprise the number of deaths in reportable motor vehicle traffic crashes by specific contributing factors:

  1. Run off the road
  2. Distracted driving
  3. Driving under the influence (DUI)
  4. Intersections
  5. Pedalcyclist
  6. Pedestrian

A reportable motor vehicle traffic crash is defined under the Annual Fatalities and Fatality Rate measures.

When reviewing the data, please note that Texas peace officers can cite multiple emphasis areas involved in one crash. One fatality will be counted for each emphasis area cited, but only one fatality will be counted in the total annual deaths to avoid double counting.

Example: A driver runs off the highway and crashes while texting on their cellphone, resulting in one death. The Texas peace officers investigating the crash cite the fatality due to both “run off the road” and “distracted driving” emphasis areas.

Why this matters: The safety of drivers on Texas roadways is TxDOT’s top priority. As part of our strategic goal, "Promote Safety," one of our objectives is to reduce crashes and deaths by continually improving guidelines and innovations, along with increasing and improving targeted awareness and education. Tracking the above safety measures informs us of the effectiveness of improvements and initiatives that target specific reasons behind crashes.

Employee Injury Rate

Description: Measurement of the injury count per 100 employees.

What is the trend?: (FY 2017 to FY 2018 comparison)

  • Injury rate: Performance Declining red arrow going up

How it is measured: Employee injury rate is calculated based on the Department of Labor’s incidence rate formula, which is the total number of injuries times 200,000 divided by the total hours worked.

The number 200,000 represents the number of hours worked in one year by 100 employees and is a benchmark number used to standardize the formula for industry-wide comparisons. Total hours worked represents the actual sum of all employee hours tracked for the reported period. Multiplying by 200,000 and dividing by total hours worked equates to the number of injuries per 100 employees.

Example: In 2016, Company A recorded 10 injuries and 750,000 actual hours worked. Therefore, the Employee Injury Rate would be 2.67 [(10 * 200,000) / 750,000].

It is important to note that the standard industry injury rates use the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recordable injury standard, which defines an injury as one that requires professional medical attention beyond simple first aid (e.g., fractures, sprains, loss of a limb). The TxDOT Employee Injury Rate is more comprehensive and includes first aid cases.

While we did have a slight uptick in the FY 2018 rate, we achieved our goal and have seen a steady decline over the past 10 years. TxDOT continues to strive for improvements in this area and has set an FY 2019 goal of 1.07 or better.

Why this matters: The safety of Texans, including all Department staff, is of the utmost importance to TxDOT, and as part of our strategic goal, “Promote Safety,” one of its objectives is to reduce employee incidents. A reduction in injuries for TxDOT employees will lead to more time on the job fulfilling the TxDOT mission to deliver a safe, reliable, and integrated transportation system that enables the movement of people and goods.

Promote Safety

Champion a culture of safety.

Objectives for goal:

  • Reduce crashes and fatalities by continuously improving guidelines and innovations along with increased targeted awareness and education.
  • Reduce employee incidents.

Performance measures for goal:

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